The Kingdom Divided

I thought I would re-post this here, as I don’t usually post Bible studies on Life for Beginners, and this seems a more appropriate place. I don’t often post Bible studies here either, but this is a specifically Messianic topic. What do you think? Does it matter whether or not we are accepted?

Life for Beginners

I have been quite shocked and disappointed this week to (re-)discover two things:

Firstly that anti-semitism is alive and kicking in the churches, particularly down here in Cornwall.

Secondly, that there are many groups and individuals who believe that gentile believers are not part of Israel proper, only on the fringe as part of the ‘commonwealth’, and that Torah is only for Jews (and beyond that, that we need the “oral Torah” to properly understand and obey Torah).

To my understanding of the scriptures, such a view and practice of exclusion is falsely resurrecting the partition wall that Yeshua tore down. It is a little bit like saying that gentiles aren’t really part of the Kingdom, which is after all what “Israel” is meant to be – the Kingdom where God reigns.

“There is neither Jew nor Greek, male nor female, slave nor free”

We are meant to be equal…

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Crafts and Topics for 2016

I have been thinking about what to do with this blog over the next year, and I think that, in addition to specifically Messianic/ Jewish topics, I will try to post on subjects covered in the TODKAH home economics curriculum, in no particular order:

todkah

– sewing
– knitting
– crochet
– embroidery
– gardening
– cooking
– baking
– flower arranging
– basketry
– budgeting
– child development
– child training
– home management
– making a house a home
– quilting
– cross stitch
– hospitality
– caring
(caring for the elderly, sick and injured, comforting the mourning)
– rug braiding
– women’s health
– pregnancy
– infant care and breastfeeding
– child bearing
– candlemaking
– soapmaking
– raising small animals
– home business

If you’re looking for a home economics curriculum, it really is unequalled – it is a 7 year programme for home educated teens (not to mention useful for their mothers!), and as you can see it covers far more than what is usually covered in school. (Certainly today, but even 30 or 40 years ago.)

I know that the uber-traditional title of the curriculum puts more moderate Christians off using the curriculum, but I think that is a pity. It’s not necessary to agree with Mrs Ann Ward’s very conservative views to make use of her expertise and knowledge in the areas of crafts and home management.

If you are interested in exploring the curriculum, take a look at the website, and join the yahoo group and/ or the facebook group/ page to discuss any of the crafts or topics covered.

A Girl Called Jack: 100 Delicious Budget Recipes

A Girl Called Jack: 100 Delicious Budget Recipes

This budget recipe book was recommended to me a year or two ago when we had a rough patch before we sold our house, and I will have to look at it again as we are struggling to budget in our reduced circumstances.

It’s a good collection of cost-cutting ideas and clever, simple recipes, although obviously cooking from scratch where economically viable. (Sometimes it works out more expensive, since there is economy of scale with packaged foods.)

Please note though that it isn’t a Christian book (although oddly, she uses a Bible quote at the beginning). I don’t remember anything particularly offensive, but I followed Jack on twitter for a while and found her to be quite foul-mouthed and unpleasant 😦 I didn’t follow her for very long though, so hopefully I just caught her in a bad mood and got the wrong impression. She was, though, very political and very ‘liberal’ (in quotes because ‘liberals’ tend not to be very keen on liberty unless it suits their purposes, but that’s a discussion for another post!).

As always though, take the ‘meat’ and leave the ‘bones’.

I would love to hear any tips you might have for frugal homemaking and cooking, as well as any other book recommendations.

Recipe: Home-made Muesli

Shalom!
How was your Hanukkah? How was your summer?
I apologise for neglecting ‘The Messianic Housewife’ for so long.
Unfortunately, having been forced from our home by an unscrupulous landlord in the spring, I have been ill ever since with a relapse and am currently housebound/ partially bedbound. Your prayers would be deeply appreciated.

I would love to become more active here, posting more regularly. As a family, since my husband is not a believer, we have become less and less observant since we moved so far away from a Jewish community. I have been thinking of how I might do something about that, but it is really dependent on me getting well.

In the meantime, I thought I would share with you a very simple recipe for healthy breakfast Muesli (and if you prefer granola, it would be easy to convert it – just add a liquid sweetener to make it stick together, and pop it in the oven).

muesli

This couldn’t be easier!

I have been trying to wean my children off sweet sugary breakfast cereals, so occasionally I make my own healthy and naturally sweet muesli:

Ingredients:

3 cups oats, or
1 cup oats,
1 cup barley flakes
1 cup millet flakes (see which you prefer)

2 cups of mixed dried fruits (you can buy a bag of mixed fruits from the health shop, or select your own)

1 cup of desiccated coconut (if you / your children like it)

1 cup of mixed seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, hemp, linseed etc.)
You can also experiment with quantities of low carb alternatives such as chia seeds)

1 cup of mixed nuts (if you / your children like it)

Something else that is recommended is cinnamon, if you like it, since it works naturally to stabilise blood sugar.

 

If you really need extra sweetness, try Agave*, erithrytol, stevia (wtih caution – it is reported to cause infertility and/ or miscarriages) or demerara (raw cane sugar, containing natural chromium, which also works naturally to stabilise blood sugar) rather than the processed varieties.

(*A note about fruit sugar: fructose is marketed as natural fruit sugar, but in fact it is just about the worst form of sugar available – think high fructose corn syrup – our bodies are just not designed to digest this in its processed form. In fruit, it’s fairly innocuous because the fibre slows it down, but it is still recommended to go easy on the fruit.)

Directions:

Mix together in a big bowl! Easy-peasy! You can store it in a plastic cereal container, or a glass mason jar.

Enjoy!

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